Cerebral Palsy and Umbilical cord cells

barbara

Pioneer Founding member
I hope they can raise the money. It does seem a bit odd to discourage everyone from leaving one's own country. What if another country is the one to find a cure? Are we all to sit tight at home and wait for our own respective countries to catch up?
 

barbara

Pioneer Founding member
Here's another warning for Australians. What is really ironic is that here in the U.S. our naysayers in academia support the studies done at Duke because they are FDA approved even though some parents I know have many doubts about that study.

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2013/s3764735.htm

It is also unbelievable that the outspoken critics who blog endlessly about patients paying out of pocket for experimental treatments have been silent about this.

Stephen Archer and his family spent around $40,000 on cord blood treatment for his then five-year-old son, Zac.


In 2010 the family travelled to Duke University in North Carolina the treatment which involved infusing Zac with blood taken from his own umbilical cord.

But Mr Archer says there was no improvement in Zac's condition.

"The theory of the magic bullet in regards to the cord blood was certainly an impetus," he said.
 

barbara

Pioneer Founding member
Very interesting pink7 I was doing the math and if Dr. Kurtzberg was charging $40,000 per patient X 250 patients that is $10,000,000.00. That's a lot of moola. It isn't clear if all were charged that, but for those researchers who keep yammering about the ethics of patients paying for experimental treatment, why are they not critical of what Dr. Kurtzberg is charging?
 

LLL6521

New member
I know for fact Duke charges, because three years ago, I talked to their staff that were doing the clinical trial. As explained to me at the time if my son did not meet the clinical trial criterias to qualify - I can pay out of pocket as a last option for treatment.
 
Top