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Thread: California Stem Cell Agency Described as 'Dismal,' 'Disappointing' and a 'Waste'

  1. #1
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    Default California Stem Cell Agency Described as 'Dismal,' 'Disappointing' and a 'Waste'

    Calling CIRM an "advanced high school science project" is appropriate in my opinion. I also like to refer to it as the California Grant Rush. Time to put it to rest or find private funding.

    California Stem Cell Report
    OCTOBER 08, 2017

    http://californiastemcellreport.blog...Cell+Report%29

    Preview of Bond Campaign: California Stem Cell Agency Described as 'Dismal,' 'Disappointing' and a 'Waste'

    A couple of die-hard opponents of the $3 billion California stem cell agency minced no words this weekend. In an op-ed piece in the Orange County Register, they described the agency as nothing more than an "advanced high school science project."

    The article was written by Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association in Sacramento, and state Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa.

    They described the agency's efforts as "dismal" and declared that "this disappointing abuse of taxpayer dollars" should be terminated.

    The print version of the article appeared in Sunday's paper, which has a circulation of about 312,000. Both the print and online version carried photographs involving stem cell research. But neither was from UC Irvine, which has received $108 million from the agency and has a member on the board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), as the agency is formally known. UC Irvine is located only 17 minutes away from the offices of the newspaper.

    The piece is a relatively tame preview of the rhetoric that will confront CIRM if it goes to the ballot in 2020 for more billions from California taxpayers. The article cited arguments from the 2004 Prop. 71 ballot measure campaign that created the agency.

    Coupal and Moorlach said,
    "According to the ballot pamphlet mailed to voters, proponents promised the bond proceeds would advance the 'cure and treatment' of 'cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, spinal cord injuries, blindness, Lou Gehrig’s disease, HIV/AIDS, mental health disorders, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, and more than 70 other diseases and injuries.'

    "But actual outcomes for these promised advances are speculative at best and nonexistent at worst. Similar benefits were promised to the California economy to 'generate millions of new tax dollars.''

    "With such a dismal record, this would be a good time to shut the spigot on issuing the remaining $345 million — meaning some $690 million would be saved by state taxpayers. That money could be better spent on pensions, schools, roads, housing or better basic medical care for our residents.

    As for the high school project business, the article said CIRM "continues to operate as a kind of advanced high-school science project, instead of moving toward the cures promised to voters in Prop. 71."

    POSTED BY DAVID JENSEN
    First treatment in 2007. Pioneering ever since.

    Barbara

  2. Default

    If they cut off the the remaining $345 million, that would certainly shut down the campaign to try and raise another bond fund!

    It's so sad, they could have helped so many people, and gotten some great therapies approved, if they had just put some focus on adult stem cells.

    Now, finally at the end of their run, they put a small amount $16 million into the Brainstorm Neurown stem cell therapy for ALS that uses the patient's own bone marrow derived stem cells.

    BrainStorm Announces Agreement with University of California Irvine Medical Center to Participate in Phase 3 Trial of NurOwn® in ALS
    http://www.prnewswire.com/news-relea...300493500.html

  3. #3
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    Default

    It's beyond sad. The pittance they've come up with for the ALS therapy should make them embarrassed. It won't though and they'll continue to toot their own horn and try to squeeze more money out of taxpayers to feed their grant guzzling appetites.

    Had they put the major focus on adult stem cells in the first place, I can only imagine where we would be today. Instead, many of those who got grant money continue to try to block every effort by doctors and commercial clinics who do want to treat patients with their own stem cells. Apparently, providing jobs to PhD's is far more important than actually finding cures.
    First treatment in 2007. Pioneering ever since.

    Barbara

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