Please Note: THIS FORUM IS PATIENT MODERATED AND IS NOT CONNECTED TO ANY CLINIC OR DOCTOR. IF YOU WISH TO CONTACT A CERTAIN DOCTOR OR CLINIC, PLEASE LOOK IN THE ASK THE DOCTOR SECTION FOR DOCTOR OR CLINIC PHONE NUMBERS AND EMAIL ADDRESSES.

                        Home || Contact Us || Help Registering and Participating || Disclaimer


 SeaChange now offers CBD Oil

 

Barbara and Jeannine's Book

Bea Luis Memorial

 


Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Autism Genes in All Humans, Study Shows

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    13,299
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Autism Genes in All Humans, Study Shows

    Laboratory Equipment
    03/22/2016
    University of Bristol

    New light has been shed on the genetic relationship between autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and ASD-related traits in the wider population, by a team of international researchers including academics from the University of Bristol, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

    The researchers studied whether there is a genetic relationship between ASD and the expression of ASD-related traits in populations not considered to have ASD. Their findings, published this week in Nature Genetics, suggest that genetic risk underlying ASD, including both inherited variants and de novo influences (not seen in an individual’s parents), affects a range of behavioral and developmental traits across the population, with those diagnosed with ASD representing a severe presentation of those traits.

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a class of neurodevelopmental conditions affecting about 1 in 100 children. They are characterized by social interaction difficulties, communication and language impairments, as well as stereotyped and repetitive behavior. These core symptoms are central to the definition of an ASD diagnosis but also occur, to varying degrees, in unaffected individuals and form an underlying behavioral continuum.

    With recent advances in genome sequencing and analysis, a picture of ASD’s genetic landscape has started to take shape. Research has shown that most ASD risk is polygenic (stemming from the combined small effects of thousands of genetic differences, distributed across the genome). Some cases are also associated with rare genetic variants of large effect, which are usually de novo.

    “There has been a lot of strong but indirect evidence that has suggested these findings,” said Mark Daly, co-director of the Broad Institute’s Medical and Population Genetics (MPG) Program and senior author of the study.

    “Once we had measurable genetic signals in hand – both polygenic risk and specific de novo mutations known to contribute to ASD – we were able to make an incontrovertible case that the genetic risk contributing to autism is genetic risk that exists in all of us, and influences our behavior and social communication.”

    “We can use behavioral and cognitive data in the general population to untangle the mechanisms through which different types of genetic risk are operating. We now have a better path forward in terms of expecting what types of disorders and traits are going to be associated with certain types of genetic risk,” Elise Robinson, study co-first author from MGH.

    “Our study shows that collecting and using phenotypic and genetic data in typically developing children can be useful in terms of the design and interpretation of studies targeting complex neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders," said study co-first author Beate St Pourcain, from the Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol and the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.

    “Based on the genetic link between population-based social-communication difficulties and clinical ASD, we may now gain further phenotypic insight into a defined set of genetically-influenced ASD symptoms. This may help us to identify and investigate biological processes in typically-developing children, which are disturbed in children with ASD.”

    The data on unaffected individuals came from a general population cohort (the Bristol-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) and a nuclear family cohort (the Simons Simplex Collection) of ASD cases and unaffected siblings; ASD collections included several large, international autism genetic studies: the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Autism group, the iPSYCH autism project in Denmark, the SSC, and the Autism Sequencing Consortium.

    “Many traits that related to disease risk – like blood pressure or cholesterol levels – demonstrate a similar continuum of risk, with contributions from common and rare genetic variants, plus environmental and chance events. The present study demonstrates how this continuum applies to a condition generally thought of as either existing or not,” said George Davey Smith, co-author and scientific director of ALSPAC.

    The researchers expect the approach to be used to explore the associations between genetic risk and behaviourl traits in other neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia in the future.
    First treatment in 2007. Pioneering ever since.

    Barbara

  2. #2

    Default

    Very well said. I believe that through stem cell procedures , children that are affected or suffering of autism could help them back in any ways.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Copyright 2007 - 2011 Stem Cell Pioneers